CROMBIE, John Nicol






John Nicol Crombie
born 11 August 1827, son of John Crombie and Margaret McKellar, baptised 2 September 1827, Barony, Lanark, Scotland, died 15 December 1878 at the residence of Mr. Hugh Peck, The Grove, Balaclava, Victoria, Australia, aged 51 years, buried compartment B grave 0320, St Kilda General Cemetery, Melbourne [1], married 23 May 1864 Garpoll Parish Church, Hereford by the Rev. J. Edwards, Harriet Berry

[1] Southern Metropolian Cemeteries Trust.



corner Bourke and Russell Streets
Melbourne, Australia
January 1855 to circa July 1855
 


The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Mon 15 January 1855, Page 8
[this notice first found published in The Argus on 1 January 1855]



Shortland Crescent
Auckland, New Zealand
from July 1855 to 18 September 1856
 

New Zealander, Volume 11, Issue 965, 14 July 1855, Page 1



Daguerreotype Portraiture.— It will be perceived by our advertising columns that Mr. Crombie has finally resolved upon leaving Auckland for the Southern Provinces, where he will doubtless be as successful with his clever reflections of the community as he has been here. His art is one peculiarly adapted to colonial requirements. It cannot be expected that portraits, taken with the pencil or the brush, should be obtainable — at least of any degree of excellence, so far from home, where practical talent of high order is sure to be retained. But by the beautiful invention, discovered almost simultaneously in England and in France, an unerring substitute for the painter's art has been provided. Should Mr. Crombie, when he shall have completed his tour among the sister settlements, be disposed to revisit the north, he will again meet with a welcome reception at the capital.
Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIII, Issue 913, 28 March 1856, Page 3


Daguerreotype Portraiture.
J. N. Crombie begs to inform those parties whose commissions he was obliged to postpone, that having now received an ample supply of material, he is in a position to serve them to any extent.

Daily Southern Cross, Volume XII, Issue 848, 14 August 1855 


J. N. Crombie begs to announce that, on the return of the " ZINGARI" from the South, he must bid farewell to Auckland. He takes this opportunity to acknowledge the very liberal patronage he has received, and desires to return his sincere thanks to those innumerable Ladies and Gentlemen who have honoured him with their visits.
DAGUERREOTYPE PORTRAIT GALLERY, SHORTLAND CRESCENT. 

P. S. — All parties having any claims on the estate are desired to submit them without delay.
Daily Southern Cross, Volume XII, Issue 873, 9 November 1855



Daguerreotype Portraiture
Notice
In consequence of the unprecedented rush, which has continued for the last month, J. N. Crombie finds it impossible, without disappointing a large section of the community, to clear out in sufficient time for this trip of the "Zingari" to the South.
New Zealander, Volume 11, Issue 1007, 8 December 1855


Portraits of New Zealand Chiefs. — We have seen the portraits of twelve New Zealand Chiefs, which have been taken by Mr. Crombie, the photographic artist, and which, together with an historical sketch of each from the pen of Mr. C. O. Davis, Government Interpreter, are intended for immediate transmission to the office of the 'London Illustrated News.'

The portraits, as a work of art, are very superior, and we trust that the presiding genii of that world renowned publication will avail themselves of a contribution so well calculated to convey a correct impression of the features and character of the aboriginal potentates of this antipodal fraction of the British Empire.

We add a list oi the twelve who are thus likely to be immortalized, —
1. Taraia Ngakuti Te Tamuhuia, principal Chief of the Thames, a great warrior and cannibal;
2. Tukihaumene Te Amohau, the principal Chief of the Ngatiwhakaue tribe, Maketu, Bay of Plenty — a restive, proud man, wedded to the superstitious practices of the old Maori school. Has great influence;
3. Paratene Puhata, a Chief of the Ngatipaoa — a man of peace, — most friendly to the Government and European settlers. His mind is deeply imbued with religious principles. Much respected by both races;
4. Ruihana Te Whakaheke, principal Chief of the Ngatitipa, Waikato, a great warrior,-- fighting general,and captured by his prowess numerous pahs;
5. Karaka Te Au, a Chief of Ngatikarere, of Waikato Heads, a well disposed man, a warm adherent of the Church Missionary Society;
6. Arama Karaka Kukutai, a young Chief of the Ngatitipa, of great promise;
7. Ihaka Takanini, Chief of Te Akitai — an extensive land holder — attached to the Europeans — a descendant of the Waiohua tribe, the original inhabitants of the Auckland district;
8. Eruera Maihi Patuone — a distinguished Chieftain of the Ngapuhi, — brother of the celebrated Waka Nene;
9. Tohi Te Tururangi Te Au — one of the Ngatiwhakaue Chiefs of Maketu, Bay of Plenty, — a man of considerable influence, sensible, and particularly loyal. Proposed to raise an army of his countrymen to defend the flag of England in the Crimea. Can trace his genealogy over a period of 500 years;
10. Ngarepo Te Amoha — son of the great Ngatiwhakaue Chief Tukehaumene — popular among his people;
11. Te Wiremu Te Tonga — the Chief of the Ngatirangewewehi tribe, Maketu, Bay of Plenty — a loyal, well disposed man, — presented an ornamented spear to his Excellency Governor Browne, when introduced to him on the Queen's birthday, 1856;
12. Tamati Waka Nene — Chief of one of the Ngapuhi tribes at Hokianga, on the West Coast of New Zealand, — a man of deep penetration, firm judgment, and indomitable courage — deservedly respected by all classes of both races.
Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIII, Issue 937, 20 June 1856, Page 3


Portraits of Native Chiefs.— We recently chronicled the fact of a dozen daguerreotype portraits of native chiefs having been taken by Mr. J. N. Crombie. We are happy to learn that, by the 'Prince of Wales,' six of these portraits, accompanied by biographical sketches from the pen of Mr. C. O. Davis, were forwarded as a contribution to the publishers of the Illustrated London News. We shall look forward with interest to the arrival and reception of this little consignment.

Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIII, Issue 945, 18 July 1856, Page 2


Photography. — It will be seen from our advertising columns that Mr. J. N. Crombie, who has just returned from a professional tour to the Bay of Islands, intends opening again in Auckland this day, and continuing to take portraits for another fortnight.
Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIII, Issue 956, 26 August 1856


Photography.— It will be seen from the list of passengers per 'Zingari' for the South, that Mr. J. N. Crombie, the photographic artist, who has been resident in Auckland for a period of fifteen months, commences a professional tour through the Southern Provinces of the colony. During Mr. Crombie's stay in Auckland, he has taken the portraits of just 1088 persons, of every class in society; and, as an artist, has been more than ordinarily successful. His pictures have a roundness and boldness of character, which are frequently found wanting in portraits by the daguerreotype process. We feel satisfied that many of the Southern colonists will avail themselves of Mr. Crombie's talent in his profession, and we wish him the same measure of success in the other towns of New Zealand that has attended his sojourn in Auckland. We are happy to learn that the Governor has very courteously acceded to a request made by Mr. Crombie for permission to assume the designation of photographer to his Excellency.
Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIII, Issue 963, 19 September 1856, Page 3


Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIII, Issue 963, 19 September 1856



Snow's Cottage, Hardy Street
Nelson
September 1856 - April 1857




Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XV, Issue 52, 27 September 1856

Photography.- It will be seen from the list of passengers per "Zingari" for the South, that Mr. J. N. Crombie, the photographic artist, who has been resident in Auckland for a period of fifteen months, commences a professional tour through the southern provinces of the colony. During Mr. Crombie's stay in Auckland, he has taken the portraits of just 1,088 persons, of every class in society and, as an artist, has been more than ordinarily successful. His pictures have a roundness and boldness of character, which are frequently found wanting in portraits by the daguerreotype process. We feel satisfied that many of the Southern colonists will avail themselves of Mr. Crombie's talent in his profession, and we wish him the same measure of success in the other towns of New Zealand that has attended his sojourn in Auckland. We are happy to learn that the Governor has very courteously acceded to a request made by Mr. Crombie for permission to assume the designation of photographer to his Excellency. Southern Cross.
Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XV, Issue 53, 1 October 1856, Page 2


Daguerreotype Portraiture. — We would recommend such of our readers as have not already paid a visit to Mr. Crombie's portrait gallery, to do so without loss of time, as that gentleman's stay in Nelson is likely, we understand, to be very short. The likenesses taken by Mr. Crombie are decidedly the best we have seen in this colony.
Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XV, Issue 70, 29 November 1856, Page 2



  It will be observed by our advertising columns that this is the last day of Mr. Crombie's present stay in Nelson. During his residence here he has taken, we are informed, no less than 450 portraits of persons in every section of the community. We have already referred to the very high character of his productions; indeed the large patronage he has received is a sufficient guarantee of their excellence. We observe that Mr. Crombie contemplates returning in a few months as a permanent setter in Nelson.
Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVI, 1 April 1857, Page 2
 
Cashel Street, Christchurch
April 1857


Lyttelton Times, Volume VIII, Issue 507, 12 September 1857, Page 8

 
Lyttelton Times, Volume VIII, Issue 512, 30 September 1857, Page 8





 



Trafalgar Street
Nelson
2 March 1858 - August 1858

Photography. — We have great pleasure in calling the attention of our fellow-settlers to Mr. Crombie's new photographic gallery, in Trafalgar-street. Since Mr. Crombie left Nelson he has visited Australia, and supplied himself with materials for carrying on his art in the most efficient manner; and a visit to his gallery, and an inspection of his new pictures, will well repay the trouble.
Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVII, Issue 18, 3 March 1858


 
 Colonist, Issue 38, 2 March 1858, Page 2
 

Photography. — We have great pleasure in calling the attention of our fellow-settlers to Mr. Crombie's new photographic gallery, in Trafalgar-street. Since Mr. Crombie left Nelson he has visited Australia, and supplied himself with materials for carrying on his art in the most efficient manner; and a visit to his gallery, and an inspection of his new pictures, will well repay the trouble.
Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVII, Issue 18, 3 March 1858, Page 2



Mr. Crombie's Portrait Gallery.— We have been rather tardy in visiting Mr. Crombie's establishment, and must express our regret thereat, but business will call men even from a due regard of local matters. However, though late, we will now give expression to that which we noticed on visiting Mr. Crombie's office. There sat Mr. Poynter in all the dignity of his magisterial office, closely elbowed by Ben Crisp, the "bullock driver." Then we saw the Provincial Secretary, several Maories, Mr. Wray of Copper Mining notoriety, Dr. Renwick, and photographs of the recent races, with an excellent portrait of Captain Nicholson; and we must express the gratification we felt at the speaking representation of the several parties we have named. Photography has of late years made most rapid marches, and we feel sure that Mr. Crombie has closely followed her quick step.
Colonist, Issue 45, 26 March 1858, Page 3




Napier
August 1858 - September 1858


Photography. — The arrival amongst us of a photographic artist is quite an event in the history of our infant township. It will be seen from our advertising columns that Mr. J. N. Crombie, to whose excellence as an artist we can speak from personal knowledge, and who has just returned from a successful professional visit to the southern provinces, — has arrived in Napier by the Wonga Wonga. His stay will be a very brief one — only till the return of the steamer; and it is scarcely necessary to remind our readers that such an opportunity does not present itself every day.
Hawke's Bay Herald, Volume 1, Issue 48, 21 August 1858, Page 2


He returned to Auckland on ketch "Pegasus" which departed Napier on 23 September 1858 and arrived in Auckland on 7 October 1858.



 
Auckland
October 1858


Photography. — One of our first solar portrait painters has returned to Auckland, and brought with him a gallery of unmistakeable proofs of his sojourn in the South. We have paid a visit to his gallery, merely for the purpose of seeing our old Southern friends, a great number of whom may be seen photographically hanging on Mr. Crombie's portrait gallery walls. The views of Nelson are remarkably good, and we believe that, looking at his photograph of the Nelson Race Meeting, we should be almost able, by means of a microscope, to decide whether the horses there show any improvement in their points, on those of a few years back.
Daily Southern Cross, Volume XV, Issue 1186, 9 November 1858, Page 4


Photography. — Mr. Crombie, who was the first to introduce the delightful art of Photography into Nelson, and who has left among us so many pleasing specimens of his skill, has sent down a very excellent specimen of his progress in a photograph of Auckland, which may be seen at Messrs. Elliott's Office. It gives an excellent idea of what Auckland has now become; and derives additional interest from the circumstance, that prominently in the foreground is seen the new embankment, and the mud flat which is thus reclaimed from the sea, and which has lately been the subject of so much litigation between the political parties there.
Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XVIII, Issue 90, 9 November 1859, Page 2


Assembly Portraits. — We are glad to welcome back to Auckland again our old friend and enterprising photographist, Mr. Crombie. His cartoon of the members of the General Assembly was much admired here. Mr. Crombie has now brought with him from England a large number of impressions of this cartoon reduced to the size of an ordinary carte de visite, each likeness being numbered, and having the corresponding name of the original at the back. These miniature cards serve well as a key to the full-sized cartoon. and are convenient for transmission by letter.
New Zealand Herald, Volume II, Issue 319, 19 November 1864


To Carpenters.— Tenders for the alteration of premises are called for by Mr. J. N. Crombie.
New Zealand Herald, Volume II, Issue 321, 22 November 1864

Photography.— Among the New Zealand residents who have returned to this Colony lately, we have to notice the arrival of Mr. J. W. Crombie (sic), the photographic artist, for many years located in Auckland, but whose name is familiar in all the provinces of New Zealand as having executed some of the best specimens of photographic art that have ever yet been produced in this Colony.  Mr. Crombie has once more returned to settle among us after an absence of some eighteen months in the mother country, and we hail his return with pleasure. 

In the year 1859 Mr. Crombie photographed two excellent views of Auckland as it then was, of which considerable notice was taken by the press. In the following year he also produced a group of admirably executed medallion portraits representing the members of the first Parliament of New Zealand. During Mr. Crombie’s recent visit to England, he attended the ordinary meeting of the Glasgow Photographic Institution where he read an interesting paper, selecting as his subject “The Rise and Progress of Photography in New Zealand,” from which we may quote a paragraph or two as follows.— “In 1841 the first European settlement was established in Auckland, the most northern province of New Zealand. The necessaries of life being the most important to a young colony, several years elapsed before an thing of a pictorial nature comes on the scene. Notwithstanding the comparative youth of photography, and in that remote region, so far back as 1849 or 1850 a gentleman was then travelling professedly as a Daguerreotype operator.

He was shortly afterwards followed by another, who also paid a flying visit to the different provinces. In the early part of 1851 a gentleman, who, with his family, emigrated to Auckland, had taken the precaution to add the Daguerreotype process as another ‘string to his bow.’ He shortly after gave up all other pursuits and followed it as a profession. He was, I believe, the first in that part of the world to introduce the calotype process.

With respect to the spread of photography in New Zealand, I may state that, when I arrived in Auckland from Melbourne, in 1855, there had been at least three operators before me in that small town of about 3000 inhabitants. A twelvemonth later, when travelling through the towns of the southern provinces, I found that several had preceded me on the same errand, and from all accounts, had finished the business. That, however, I found not to be the case so far as I was concerned, having always as much professional occupation as I could attend to.

According to the census taken in December last, the population of Auckland and suburbs was about 10,000. The photographic wants of this population are ministered to by six professional photographers, besides others who practice the art occasionally. The other towns, in proportion to their population, are equally well supplied with operators. It will thus be seen that we have no lack of aspirants after photographic fame.

Since the foregoing was written it is almost needless to say that in the photographic art as well as in all other matters Auckland has made rapid progress, the paragraphs extracted however are interesting as showing how far we had then progressed in these matters.
New Zealander, Volume XXI, Issue 2284, 25 November 1864






 
 above - this carte de visite by John Nicol Crombie is dated 1870.


 





Death
Yesterday afternoon, says Tuesday's Herald, Mr W. Aitken received a telegram from London informing him that Mr J. N. Crombie, formerly photographer in Auckland, had died in Melbourne, on his way to Auckland. In a letter dated at Melbourne on December 11, Mr Crombie had informed Mr Aitken that he would leave Melbourne so as to catch the mail steamer leaving Sydney for Auckland on January 2. Mr Crombie had been complaining of bronchitis for some six or seven months, and he adds to his letter, "still very wheezy." He must have become worse shortly after writing the letter, and probably was dead before the time came to leave for Sydney. 

Mr Crombie came out to Melbourne at the time of the gold discoveries in 1852, and not finding employment at his trade of a practical engineer, he went as assistant to a photographer, with whom he learned the business. In about two years afterwards, he came to New Zealand, and commenced business as a photographer in Nelson. He removed to Auckland about sixteen years ago, and opened in Shortland Crescent. In 1864, he went to England, and while he was absent his place was burned. On his return, he erected premises in Queen street, where he continued for several years. 

Having been successful in mining speculations, he purchased a considerable quantity of property in Auckland, and retired from business. For the last six years he has resided at Sydenham, near London. Having become afflicted with bronchitis, he determined on a trip to New Zealand, which he was destined never to see again. Mr Crombie was about 48 years of age; he leaves a widow and five children.
Thames Star, Volume XI, Issue 3086, 8 January 1879, Page 2


Crombie.- On the 15th inst., at the residence of Mr. Hugh Peck, The Grove, Balaclava, Victoria, John Nicholas Crombie [sic], Esq., of St Mungo villa, Amberley-road, West-hill, Sydenham, London, late of Victoria and New Zealand, aged 51 years. New Zealand papers please copy.
The Argus, Tuesday 17 December 1878 page 1

 
 The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Tuesday 17 December 1878, page 8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5925056



Awards
1862 International Exhibition, London, Class XIV, Photography and Photographic Apparatus. Award - Honorable mention for views in the colony.
Otago Daily Times, Issue 751, 14 May 1864  




1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Enjoyed finding burial details as needed by his great granddaughter, nee Crombie. We searched cemetery records years ago unsuccessfully.